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Meet the students letting you test for HIV with an app and helping you survive the apocalypse

This past weekend, the Clinton family returned to the University of Miami to host their eighth annual Clinton Global Initiative University conference. Joining them were over 1000 students from around the world, selected to attend the three-day event that serves as a think tank for young innovators.

This year’s theme? Big data, and how technology is helping address huge challenges around the world. Fusion had the opportunity to meet a group of students who brought their own ideas to the table — and we’re seriously inspired. Check out how two of the most innovative participant projects could seriously change lives.

HIVSmart

Creator:

Stephen Gamboa, graduate student at Arizona State University, was one of over 1,000 students who attended the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University

<em>Stephen Gamboa, graduate student at Arizona State University, was one of over 1,000 students who attended the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University (Ignacio Torres / Fusion)</em>

Stephen Gamboa, Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Health innovation

Elevator pitch:

An HIV testing app and adapter that allows individuals to get rapid test results from the comfort of their own home

The product, in its creator’s words:

“There are two products – the smart phone application as well as an HIV oral test. It’s an inclusive package; you need one for the other. Basically, you would swab your mouth and in about 10 to 15 minutes, you would plug the oral test into the smart phone.

The smart phone would then prompt you and ask you, ‘Do you want to see your results? They’re ready.’ You would then have to subscribe and say yes and a video will come up and not only deliver your results, but it will automatically deliver HIV counseling.

The app will provide resources in the area via GPS locator and it will provide anonymous chatting. So, say I have a question but I don’t want to identify myself about being HIV positive. Then you can go and this chat room and there will be anonymous doctors, anonymous nurses and people living with HIV that are just there to answer questions that you have. If you are newly diagnosed with HIV you can kind of understand what you’re up against and what it’s going to take from here on out.”

STEPHEN GAMBOA

The goal:

I really want people to feel like they can test themselves for HIV without being fearful of the results, and I know that’s an impossible request — there’s always going to be some fear. But the more we can alleviate that fear the better off we’ll be. I really want people to take that HIV test at home and deal with it on their own terms, digest it on their own terms, but still be given the resources and the urgency necessary to move forward with HIV. [I want to] show them the seriousness of the problem, but show them that they can still live a very full and functioning life with HIV, and if they handle it in the correct ways, that they will be okay.”

Carrying the World On Our Backs

Co-Creators:

Kristeen Reynolds and Joshua Barnes, students at Lamar University, share their milti-purpose tent idea with over 1,000 students during the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University conference.  (Ignacio Torres / Fusion)

<em>Kristeen Reynolds and Joshua Barnes, students at Lamar University, share their multi-purpose tent idea with over 1,000 students during the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University conference. (Ignacio Torres / Fusion) </em>

Kristeen Reynolds, Lamar University, Accounting and Entrepreneurship Major and Joshua Barnes, Lamar University, Engineering Major

Elevator pitch:

A multi-purpose tent meant for survival in destruction areas

The product, in its creators’ words:

Joshua: “I believe that good design should mimic nature. And in nature we see, good design which is functional and is beautiful. And I believe the tent is that. So everything is based on something simple, the tent is based on a triangle. It unfolds origami style. We can easily replace panels, such as if we want to replace a panel with a solar cell I can say, ‘Okay, this is the right shape because it’s based off a triangle.’ The wind can easily flow over the tent.”

Kristeen: “The thought process into the name was creating something that you can have on your back and could provide shelter. Because we figured out that a lot of times after natural disasters more people are killed because of the conditions, not necessarily after the disaster, so our thought process was, ‘What can we make that can help with that aftermath?”

KRISTEEN REYNOLDS

The Goal:

Kristeen: “We definitely want our product to be able to help in the natural disaster regions, but we also want to take it to the next level for recreational purposes. We think it has a lot of commercial viability with hunters, hikers and campers. So I think we have a lot of potential, we’re hoping to meet with the right people to take it to the next level.”

Joshua: “There are a lot of products out there that deal with helping people on disaster storms; however, they are large and bulky. Often one person can’t carry it into a disaster zone; it’s usually shipped or trucked there. Our product, a single person can bring a structure to where it needs to go. So not only can you bring a structure to people who need it, let’s say you are a first responder, now you have a structure to work out of.”

Joshua Barnes

Click here to read all of Fusion’s coverage of the Clinton Global Initiative.

Meet the students letting you test for HIV with an app and helping you survive the apocalypse

This past weekend, the Clinton family returned to the University of Miami to host their eighth annual Clinton Global Initiative University conference. Joining them were over 1000 students from around the world, selected to attend the three-day event that serves as a think tank for young innovators.

This year’s theme? Big data, and how technology is helping address huge challenges around the world. Fusion had the opportunity to meet a group of students who brought their own ideas to the table — and we’re seriously inspired. Check out how two of the most innovative participant projects could seriously change lives.

HIVSmart

Creator:

Stephen Gamboa, graduate student at Arizona State University, was one of over 1,000 students who attended the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University

<em>Stephen Gamboa, graduate student at Arizona State University, was one of over 1,000 students who attended the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University (Ignacio Torres / Fusion)</em>

Stephen Gamboa, Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Health innovation

Elevator pitch:

An HIV testing app and adapter that allows individuals to get rapid test results from the comfort of their own home

The product, in its creator’s words:

“There are two products – the smart phone application as well as an HIV oral test. It’s an inclusive package; you need one for the other. Basically, you would swab your mouth and in about 10 to 15 minutes, you would plug the oral test into the smart phone.

The smart phone would then prompt you and ask you, ‘Do you want to see your results? They’re ready.’ You would then have to subscribe and say yes and a video will come up and not only deliver your results, but it will automatically deliver HIV counseling.

The app will provide resources in the area via GPS locator and it will provide anonymous chatting. So, say I have a question but I don’t want to identify myself about being HIV positive. Then you can go and this chat room and there will be anonymous doctors, anonymous nurses and people living with HIV that are just there to answer questions that you have. If you are newly diagnosed with HIV you can kind of understand what you’re up against and what it’s going to take from here on out.”

STEPHEN GAMBOA

The goal:

I really want people to feel like they can test themselves for HIV without being fearful of the results, and I know that’s an impossible request — there’s always going to be some fear. But the more we can alleviate that fear the better off we’ll be. I really want people to take that HIV test at home and deal with it on their own terms, digest it on their own terms, but still be given the resources and the urgency necessary to move forward with HIV. [I want to] show them the seriousness of the problem, but show them that they can still live a very full and functioning life with HIV, and if they handle it in the correct ways, that they will be okay.”

Carrying the World On Our Backs

Co-Creators:

Kristeen Reynolds and Joshua Barnes, students at Lamar University, share their milti-purpose tent idea with over 1,000 students during the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University conference.  (Ignacio Torres / Fusion)

<em>Kristeen Reynolds and Joshua Barnes, students at Lamar University, share their multi-purpose tent idea with over 1,000 students during the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University conference. (Ignacio Torres / Fusion) </em>

Kristeen Reynolds, Lamar University, Accounting and Entrepreneurship Major and Joshua Barnes, Lamar University, Engineering Major

Elevator pitch:

A multi-purpose tent meant for survival in destruction areas

The product, in its creators’ words:

Joshua: “I believe that good design should mimic nature. And in nature we see, good design which is functional and is beautiful. And I believe the tent is that. So everything is based on something simple, the tent is based on a triangle. It unfolds origami style. We can easily replace panels, such as if we want to replace a panel with a solar cell I can say, ‘Okay, this is the right shape because it’s based off a triangle.’ The wind can easily flow over the tent.”

Kristeen: “The thought process into the name was creating something that you can have on your back and could provide shelter. Because we figured out that a lot of times after natural disasters more people are killed because of the conditions, not necessarily after the disaster, so our thought process was, ‘What can we make that can help with that aftermath?”

KRISTEEN REYNOLDS

The Goal:

Kristeen: “We definitely want our product to be able to help in the natural disaster regions, but we also want to take it to the next level for recreational purposes. We think it has a lot of commercial viability with hunters, hikers and campers. So I think we have a lot of potential, we’re hoping to meet with the right people to take it to the next level.”

Joshua: “There are a lot of products out there that deal with helping people on disaster storms; however, they are large and bulky. Often one person can’t carry it into a disaster zone; it’s usually shipped or trucked there. Our product, a single person can bring a structure to where it needs to go. So not only can you bring a structure to people who need it, let’s say you are a first responder, now you have a structure to work out of.”

Joshua Barnes

Click here to read all of Fusion’s coverage of the Clinton Global Initiative.

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