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‎I Am Charlie: The world reacts to terror in France

Horrifying video captured part of the attack as masked gunmen roamed the streets of Paris and executed a wounded police officer, shooting at point-blank range.

It’s just moments after the terrorists stormed the offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. They killed 12 people and wounded 11 more. Among the dead were the paper’s editor-in-chief and several cartoonists.

It’s the worst terror attack in France in modern history, but it’s not the first time the paper has been targeted: Charlie Hebdo cartoonists frequently lampoon all organized religions, and a cartoon in 2011 depicting the Prophet Muhammad resulted in the firebombing of the paper’s offices.

READ MORE: The Charlie Hebdo attack could explode the racial and immigrant tensions that have been simmering in France for years

Tonight in Paris and around the globe, people are rallying to honor the dead and support the survivors. Cartoonists have turned to Twitter to highlight the importance of freedom of the press.

Maybe one of the victims of today’s shooting said it best. Editor-in-Chief Shephane Charbonnier spoke to ABC News in 2012 about the risks he and his colleagues faced.

“Our job is not to defend freedom of speech, but without it we’re dead,” he said. “We can’t live in a country without freedom of speech. I prefer to die than to live like a rat.”

Credit: Jesse Swinger

‎I Am Charlie: The world reacts to terror in France

Horrifying video captured part of the attack as masked gunmen roamed the streets of Paris and executed a wounded police officer, shooting at point-blank range.

It’s just moments after the terrorists stormed the offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper. They killed 12 people and wounded 11 more. Among the dead were the paper’s editor-in-chief and several cartoonists.

It’s the worst terror attack in France in modern history, but it’s not the first time the paper has been targeted: Charlie Hebdo cartoonists frequently lampoon all organized religions, and a cartoon in 2011 depicting the Prophet Muhammad resulted in the firebombing of the paper’s offices.

READ MORE: The Charlie Hebdo attack could explode the racial and immigrant tensions that have been simmering in France for years

Tonight in Paris and around the globe, people are rallying to honor the dead and support the survivors. Cartoonists have turned to Twitter to highlight the importance of freedom of the press.

Maybe one of the victims of today’s shooting said it best. Editor-in-Chief Shephane Charbonnier spoke to ABC News in 2012 about the risks he and his colleagues faced.

“Our job is not to defend freedom of speech, but without it we’re dead,” he said. “We can’t live in a country without freedom of speech. I prefer to die than to live like a rat.”

Credit: Jesse Swinger

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