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This is the Latino lives movement you probably haven't heard of, but really should

Forty-six years ago today, more than 30,000 Chicano activists took to the streets of L.A. to march against the Vietnam war.

The activists came from cities across the country to call attention to the number of Mexican-Americans who were being sent to fight and die disproportionately in the Vietnam war.

From 1961 to 1967, Mexican-Americans represented 10% of the population in the southwestern United States, yet 20% of U.S. soldiers killed in combat in Vietnam, according to research from political science professor Dr. Ralph Guzman.

“Nobody was going to do anything until we first began standing up and speaking out and that’s what i decided to do,” said Rosalío Muños, the co-founder of the Chicano Moratorium who helped organize the August 29, 1970 march.

This sparked a movement in defense of Latinx lives. It wasn’t exactly a Black Lives Matter moment. No two moments in history are the same. But it was the beginning of a Latinx-led push for civil rights and part of U.S. history that many in the community are making sure is not forgotten four decades years later.

Here’s their story.

This is the Latino lives movement you probably haven't heard of, but really should

Forty-six years ago today, more than 30,000 Chicano activists took to the streets of L.A. to march against the Vietnam war.

The activists came from cities across the country to call attention to the number of Mexican-Americans who were being sent to fight and die disproportionately in the Vietnam war.

From 1961 to 1967, Mexican-Americans represented 10% of the population in the southwestern United States, yet 20% of U.S. soldiers killed in combat in Vietnam, according to research from political science professor Dr. Ralph Guzman.

“Nobody was going to do anything until we first began standing up and speaking out and that’s what i decided to do,” said Rosalío Muños, the co-founder of the Chicano Moratorium who helped organize the August 29, 1970 march.

This sparked a movement in defense of Latinx lives. It wasn’t exactly a Black Lives Matter moment. No two moments in history are the same. But it was the beginning of a Latinx-led push for civil rights and part of U.S. history that many in the community are making sure is not forgotten four decades years later.

Here’s their story.

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