Up Next

Jim Parsons would rather dance to Rihanna than J.Lo

Provincetown is ground zero of same-sex marriages

For Gary and Ned Monroe-Sabatini, their marriage has been two decades in the making.

“I, personally, am a little nervous. We’ve been together for 19 years and nothing is going to change other than the piece of paper,” says Gary, minutes after filing the necessary paperwork that will make his 19 year partnership legal in the state of Massachusetts.

More importantly, says Ned, the marriage certificate is the peace of mind and security he’s been wanting for their two teenage children.

“God forbid, something happened to Gary or myself, our family is going to be protected,” explains Ned.

It’s a protection that was made possible 10 years ago, when Massachusetts became the first state to allow same-sex couples to walk down the aisle. On May 17, 2004, hundreds of couples lined city halls across the state, to finally make their partnerships legal.

Provincetown is ground zero of same-sex marriages

For Gary and Ned Monroe-Sabatini, their marriage has been two decades in the making.

“I, personally, am a little nervous. We’ve been together for 19 years and nothing is going to change other than the piece of paper,” says Gary, minutes after filing the necessary paperwork that will make his 19 year partnership legal in the state of Massachusetts.

More importantly, says Ned, the marriage certificate is the peace of mind and security he’s been wanting for their two teenage children.

“God forbid, something happened to Gary or myself, our family is going to be protected,” explains Ned.

It’s a protection that was made possible 10 years ago, when Massachusetts became the first state to allow same-sex couples to walk down the aisle. On May 17, 2004, hundreds of couples lined city halls across the state, to finally make their partnerships legal.

WHERE TO WATCH