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Fourth of July? More Like Fake of July: Our Real Independence Day

The Fourth of July is generally accepted as America’s day of independence, but technically it’s not.

On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress (you know, all those old Founding Father dudes) approved the Declaration of Independence.

The Declaration of Independence had actually been drafted by Thomas
Jefferson
a few weeks prior and was submitted for approval on July 2. But of course, everybody had to fight about the wording for few days (lol Congress).

It could be argued that July 2 is our real independence day — after all, it’s the day the Continental Congress declared the U.S. independent from Great Britain. John Adams even thought July 2 would become a big fancy holiday, but alas.

Of course, even after declaring independence, we weren’t exactly independent. The Declaration of Independence wasn’t even published until mid-August (because 1776) and even then Great Britain never formally responded.

However, Great Britain did secretly commission a pamphlet mocking the Declaration of Independence, especially the part about “all men created equal” even though Americans had slaves.

Of course, by the time the U.S. declared their independence the Revolutionary War was well under way (you’d think it’s more logical to start a war for independence after declaring independence but then again, America).

The Revolutionary War went on until 1783. That’s seven years after our so called “Independence Day” but whatever, when you make a declaration you stick to it because that’s what it means to be American. The war formally ended on September 3, 1783, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris, but who wants to celebrate the Third of September?

So why do we celebrate the Fourth of July as our Independence Day? Because America, that’s why. Now, go have a hot dog and watch some fireworks.

Fourth of July? More Like Fake of July: Our Real Independence Day

The Fourth of July is generally accepted as America’s day of independence, but technically it’s not.

On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress (you know, all those old Founding Father dudes) approved the Declaration of Independence.

The Declaration of Independence had actually been drafted by Thomas
Jefferson
a few weeks prior and was submitted for approval on July 2. But of course, everybody had to fight about the wording for few days (lol Congress).

It could be argued that July 2 is our real independence day — after all, it’s the day the Continental Congress declared the U.S. independent from Great Britain. John Adams even thought July 2 would become a big fancy holiday, but alas.

Of course, even after declaring independence, we weren’t exactly independent. The Declaration of Independence wasn’t even published until mid-August (because 1776) and even then Great Britain never formally responded.

However, Great Britain did secretly commission a pamphlet mocking the Declaration of Independence, especially the part about “all men created equal” even though Americans had slaves.

Of course, by the time the U.S. declared their independence the Revolutionary War was well under way (you’d think it’s more logical to start a war for independence after declaring independence but then again, America).

The Revolutionary War went on until 1783. That’s seven years after our so called “Independence Day” but whatever, when you make a declaration you stick to it because that’s what it means to be American. The war formally ended on September 3, 1783, with the signing of the Treaty of Paris, but who wants to celebrate the Third of September?

So why do we celebrate the Fourth of July as our Independence Day? Because America, that’s why. Now, go have a hot dog and watch some fireworks.

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