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The Donkey and Elephant Will Never Be Friends

We all know that Democrats and Republicans rarely agree on anything.

But according to a recent Pew political survey, the donkey and elephant are farther apart ideologically than any other point in recent history.

The typical Republican is now more conservative than 94 percent of Democrats, up from 70 percent 20 years ago. The average Democrat is more liberal than 92 percent of Republicans, an increase from 64 percent.

43 percent of Republicans and 38 percent of Democrats have very negative opinions of the other party, compared to 20 years ago when it was 17 percent and 16 percent respectively.

It gets worse. A majority of Republicans and Democrats who have a very unfavorable view of the opposing party also say that the other party’s policies are a threat to the country’s well-being.

For intense partisans like that, the midterms this November and the presidential election in 2016 might be about much more than power in a famously dysfunctional capitol.

Credit: Eric Herbst, Daniel Munoz

The Donkey and Elephant Will Never Be Friends

We all know that Democrats and Republicans rarely agree on anything.

But according to a recent Pew political survey, the donkey and elephant are farther apart ideologically than any other point in recent history.

The typical Republican is now more conservative than 94 percent of Democrats, up from 70 percent 20 years ago. The average Democrat is more liberal than 92 percent of Republicans, an increase from 64 percent.

43 percent of Republicans and 38 percent of Democrats have very negative opinions of the other party, compared to 20 years ago when it was 17 percent and 16 percent respectively.

It gets worse. A majority of Republicans and Democrats who have a very unfavorable view of the opposing party also say that the other party’s policies are a threat to the country’s well-being.

For intense partisans like that, the midterms this November and the presidential election in 2016 might be about much more than power in a famously dysfunctional capitol.

Credit: Eric Herbst, Daniel Munoz

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