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WNBA Recognizes LGBT Fans at First Ever Pride Game, Too Little, Too Late?

This Sunday ESPN 2 will air the first nationally televised pride-themed game, where WNBA players will wear commemorative pride shirts, the pride logo will appear in courtside signage and the league’s LGBT community will be celebrated.

The game is part of the WNBA’s new dedicated marketing platform for inclusion and equality launched earlier this month. It’s the first American Pro Sports league to openly recruit LGBT fans, but some are wondering if the effort is too little, too late.

Juliet Macur over at the New York Times was among one of those skeptical voices, writing:

“Only now that the coast is clear has the W.N.B.A. decided to publicly embrace its gay fans. The gesture deserves two slow claps, considering how long it took. The league could have done this sooner, and helped change the sports world; instead, it’s merely taking advantage of a changed world.”

Fusion’s Alicia Menendez sat down with co-founder of Br{ache the Silence Campaign, Nevin Caple, sports commentator and author Cyd Zeigler, and ESPN writer and former NCAA player, Kate Fagan.

Credit: Victoria Moreno and Paola Bolano

WNBA Recognizes LGBT Fans at First Ever Pride Game, Too Little, Too Late?

This Sunday ESPN 2 will air the first nationally televised pride-themed game, where WNBA players will wear commemorative pride shirts, the pride logo will appear in courtside signage and the league’s LGBT community will be celebrated.

The game is part of the WNBA’s new dedicated marketing platform for inclusion and equality launched earlier this month. It’s the first American Pro Sports league to openly recruit LGBT fans, but some are wondering if the effort is too little, too late.

Juliet Macur over at the New York Times was among one of those skeptical voices, writing:

“Only now that the coast is clear has the W.N.B.A. decided to publicly embrace its gay fans. The gesture deserves two slow claps, considering how long it took. The league could have done this sooner, and helped change the sports world; instead, it’s merely taking advantage of a changed world.”

Fusion’s Alicia Menendez sat down with co-founder of Br{ache the Silence Campaign, Nevin Caple, sports commentator and author Cyd Zeigler, and ESPN writer and former NCAA player, Kate Fagan.

Credit: Victoria Moreno and Paola Bolano

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