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Is there a truly 'pro-life' Republican running for president?

When I asked protesters at the 2016 March for Life what it meant to be “pro-life,” I heard a lot about abortion. People also told me, over and over again, that it meant “respecting life from birth to natural death.”

But a lot happens between birth and death. Babies get sick and need to go to the doctor. Kids grow up and need access to affordable education. People get pregnant and need time off from work to take care of themselves and their growing families. Parents face a nonstop balancing act to keep food on the table and find stable housing. People get older and need health care and support after they retire.

These aren’t policy issues that the mainstream anti-abortion movement addresses, and they weren’t mentioned by a single speaker at the march.

But some of the protesters I met did talk about them. And it showed that, at least for a certain segment of the anti-abortion movement, voting in the 2016 election could be a challenge. If a hard line against abortion is a must for these voters, they won’t find a Republican candidate who also supports the policies—universal paid family leave, the Affordable Care Act, and raising the minimum wage—that support working families.

So what’s a self-described pro-life voter to do?

Is there a truly 'pro-life' Republican running for president?

When I asked protesters at the 2016 March for Life what it meant to be “pro-life,” I heard a lot about abortion. People also told me, over and over again, that it meant “respecting life from birth to natural death.”

But a lot happens between birth and death. Babies get sick and need to go to the doctor. Kids grow up and need access to affordable education. People get pregnant and need time off from work to take care of themselves and their growing families. Parents face a nonstop balancing act to keep food on the table and find stable housing. People get older and need health care and support after they retire.

These aren’t policy issues that the mainstream anti-abortion movement addresses, and they weren’t mentioned by a single speaker at the march.

But some of the protesters I met did talk about them. And it showed that, at least for a certain segment of the anti-abortion movement, voting in the 2016 election could be a challenge. If a hard line against abortion is a must for these voters, they won’t find a Republican candidate who also supports the policies—universal paid family leave, the Affordable Care Act, and raising the minimum wage—that support working families.

So what’s a self-described pro-life voter to do?

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