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Mexican musicians release protest anthem for missing Ayotzinapa students

The tragedy of 43 disappeared students in Mexico now has a soundtrack. Mexican musician Michelle Solano channeled her outrage into creativity and activism by reaching out to friends on social media and organizing a group of 25 musicians to record the protest song “Grito de Guerra,” or “Battle Cry.”

The lyrics allude to Mexico’s national anthem, while criticizing the government for allowing impunity and violence.

“I have listened to this song alone while mixing in the studio, and I have cried from outage, and it hurts,” said Juan Jose Rodriguez, the arranger of the song. “We hope that the people who listen feel the pain, and that we’ve passed along that feeling of rage.”

He said he hopes the song will “drive people to action.”

The musicians can be found on Twitter at @Grito_GuerraMX.

Today, protests for the missing students are being held in Mexico and across the world – the hashtags to follow on Twitter are #20NovMex and #GlobalActionforAyotzinapa.

For more on the missing students, see Fusion’s full coverage of the Ayotzinapa case.

Video shot and edited in Mexico City by Tania Miranda, with additional footage provided by Juan Gessner

Produced in Miami by Jared Goyette and Carlos Navarrete

Mexican musicians release protest anthem for missing Ayotzinapa students

The tragedy of 43 disappeared students in Mexico now has a soundtrack. Mexican musician Michelle Solano channeled her outrage into creativity and activism by reaching out to friends on social media and organizing a group of 25 musicians to record the protest song “Grito de Guerra,” or “Battle Cry.”

The lyrics allude to Mexico’s national anthem, while criticizing the government for allowing impunity and violence.

“I have listened to this song alone while mixing in the studio, and I have cried from outage, and it hurts,” said Juan Jose Rodriguez, the arranger of the song. “We hope that the people who listen feel the pain, and that we’ve passed along that feeling of rage.”

He said he hopes the song will “drive people to action.”

The musicians can be found on Twitter at @Grito_GuerraMX.

Today, protests for the missing students are being held in Mexico and across the world – the hashtags to follow on Twitter are #20NovMex and #GlobalActionforAyotzinapa.

For more on the missing students, see Fusion’s full coverage of the Ayotzinapa case.

Video shot and edited in Mexico City by Tania Miranda, with additional footage provided by Juan Gessner

Produced in Miami by Jared Goyette and Carlos Navarrete

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