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How Latinos in Iowa are getting ready for their first big moment of 2016

With just days until the Iowa caucus, young Latinos are braving the cold to rally as many registered voters in their communities as possible.

“My parents are immigrants,” said Marlu Abarca, 23, a volunteer who’s been knocking on doors in Des Moines, handing out pamphlets explaining how the caucuses work. “I have the access to education that my parents did not have. As Latino millennials, we become informed and we can then inform our parents and our families.”

And there’s a lot at stake. February 1 will be the first show of political power for Latinos in the 2016 election. There are currently 50,000 registered Latino voters across Iowa. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the country’s largest and oldest Hispanic organization, says its working to get between 10,000 and 20,000 of them to caucus.

“Our young people do not like the message we’re hearing from Donald Trump. That’s really getting them to participate,—that’s getting them riled up,” said Christian Ucles, 33, LULAC’s Political Director in Iowa. “I’m not going to be a victim. I’m going to be someone who drives the conversation forward.”

Fusion’s Mariana Atencio was in Iowa to speak with Latino community organizers.

Watch the full story below

How Latinos in Iowa are getting ready for their first big moment of 2016

With just days until the Iowa caucus, young Latinos are braving the cold to rally as many registered voters in their communities as possible.

“My parents are immigrants,” said Marlu Abarca, 23, a volunteer who’s been knocking on doors in Des Moines, handing out pamphlets explaining how the caucuses work. “I have the access to education that my parents did not have. As Latino millennials, we become informed and we can then inform our parents and our families.”

And there’s a lot at stake. February 1 will be the first show of political power for Latinos in the 2016 election. There are currently 50,000 registered Latino voters across Iowa. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the country’s largest and oldest Hispanic organization, says its working to get between 10,000 and 20,000 of them to caucus.

“Our young people do not like the message we’re hearing from Donald Trump. That’s really getting them to participate,—that’s getting them riled up,” said Christian Ucles, 33, LULAC’s Political Director in Iowa. “I’m not going to be a victim. I’m going to be someone who drives the conversation forward.”

Fusion’s Mariana Atencio was in Iowa to speak with Latino community organizers.

Watch the full story below

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