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BP Oil Spill: What Happened After the Cameras Left?

The mainstream media has a short attention span for ecological disasters like the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

But Director Margaret Brown’s SXSW Best Documentary winner “The Great Invisible” uses real human stories, from crew survivors to oil executives, to trace the lingering impact of the spill four years later.

Fusion’s interview with director Margaret Brown is part of AM Tonight’s ongoing series celebrating “Women In Movies.” While female directors are relatively well-represented in documentary filmmaking, the film industry is far from achieving parity behind the scenes and in front of the camera. Brown’s “The Great Invisible” is a great example of the critical stories and powerful storytelling women contribute to the industry.

Credit: Romina Puga, Andrea Torres, Bianca Perez, & Andy Dubbin

BP Oil Spill: What Happened After the Cameras Left?

The mainstream media has a short attention span for ecological disasters like the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

But Director Margaret Brown’s SXSW Best Documentary winner “The Great Invisible” uses real human stories, from crew survivors to oil executives, to trace the lingering impact of the spill four years later.

Fusion’s interview with director Margaret Brown is part of AM Tonight’s ongoing series celebrating “Women In Movies.” While female directors are relatively well-represented in documentary filmmaking, the film industry is far from achieving parity behind the scenes and in front of the camera. Brown’s “The Great Invisible” is a great example of the critical stories and powerful storytelling women contribute to the industry.

Credit: Romina Puga, Andrea Torres, Bianca Perez, & Andy Dubbin

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