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Youngest Congresswoman ever, a gay Republican and Clay Aiken: Midterms are more interesting than you think

As Midterm Election Day creeps closer, political campaigns are targeting particular voting blocks. Among the most targeted: young adults ages 18 to 29. There’s no disputing the power of our generations’ vote – it was part of the reason for President Barack Obama’s victory back in 2008. Still, as the big, less glamorous midterm elections inch closer, it’s smart to take on AM Tonight’s approach when thinking of these elections: Ask not what you can do for politicians, but what politicians can do for you.

Fusion’s Alicia Menendez sat down with ABC News’ Political Director, Rick Klein, to discuss the top five races that could impact our generation.

1) New York’s 21st Congressional District:

The race for New York’s 21st Congressional District is close – too close. With Democrat Aaron Woolf running against Republican Elise Stefanik, the race, at this point, is considered a toss-up.

NY 21 GFX
But, if Elise Stefanik wins, she could be the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, at 29 years old.

Elise Stefanik.jpeg

2) Arizona’s 9th Congressional District:

Arizona’s 9th Congressional District made history in 2012, when Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) was the first openly bisexual politician ever elected to Congress. Rep. Sinema is defending her seat in this relatively new district that will hold just its second election. Sinema won the seat in 2012 by a mere 10,000 votes. Young people make up almost a quarter of the resident population in Arizona’s 9th district, and in the last midterm election, more than 27,000 young people cast their ballots. But is her moment in Congressional history enough for the incumbent to hold on to her seat this November?

AZ 9th GFX

‘My vote doesn’t make a difference’ is often a reason given for not showing up to the polls; but in this particular race—your vote (the youth vote in particular) –could be THE difference; making Congress more reflective of a diverse America.

Kyrsten Sinema meme.jpeg

3) Massachusetts 6th Congressional District:

Democrat Seth Moulton is running against Republican Richard Tisei for Massachusetts’ 6th Congressional District seat. Moulton, a 35-year-old veteran and former Marine Corps officer, is running on the slogan: “Let’s bring a new generation of leadership back to Washington.” Our generation has become disillusioned with government, seeking out change beyond Capitol Hill, but is Moulton setting precedence to change from within?

MA 6th GFX

But Moulton’s only half the ticket. Tisei recently released an ad where he spends the first half attacking his Democratic challenger, and then closes the ad with “my husband and I live right on Main Street, next door to my mom.” Is he the new face of the GOP?

Tisei Meme.jpeg

4) North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District:

Incumbent Renee Ellmers is facing challenger Clay Aiken in the race for North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District. Yes… that Clay Aiken.

NC 2nd GFX

Clay Aiken wants America’s vote again this November, but will his celebrity status help or hurt him in his battle to unseat incumbent Rep. Ellmers? Warning: Don’t ask him to sing.

clay aiken

5) Kentucky’s Senatorial Race:

The Senate race in Kentucky is closer than ever. On Tuesday, The Washington Post reported that a new Bluegrass Poll indicated the race is a statistical dead heat between Sen. Mitch McConnell (R) at 47 percent, and Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) at 46 percent.

Kentucky Senate GFX

This has been THE race to watch this election season. If Grimes wins, she could unseat incumbent Senator McConnell, who has been the Republican Senator of Kentucky since 1985 and is expected to be majority leader if Republicans gain the seats necessary to take back the Senate. But if this is THE race of the midterm election, why did the Democrats pull support for Grimes with November quickly approaching?

alison lundergan grimes meme.jpeg

For more midterm election coverage, be sure to tune in to “AM Tonight” every Tuesday at 9 pm ET on Fusion.

Credit: Victoria Moreno, Johanna Rojas and Stephanie Parra

Youngest Congresswoman ever, a gay Republican and Clay Aiken: Midterms are more interesting than you think

As Midterm Election Day creeps closer, political campaigns are targeting particular voting blocks. Among the most targeted: young adults ages 18 to 29. There’s no disputing the power of our generations’ vote – it was part of the reason for President Barack Obama’s victory back in 2008. Still, as the big, less glamorous midterm elections inch closer, it’s smart to take on AM Tonight’s approach when thinking of these elections: Ask not what you can do for politicians, but what politicians can do for you.

Fusion’s Alicia Menendez sat down with ABC News’ Political Director, Rick Klein, to discuss the top five races that could impact our generation.

1) New York’s 21st Congressional District:

The race for New York’s 21st Congressional District is close – too close. With Democrat Aaron Woolf running against Republican Elise Stefanik, the race, at this point, is considered a toss-up.

NY 21 GFX
But, if Elise Stefanik wins, she could be the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, at 29 years old.

Elise Stefanik.jpeg

2) Arizona’s 9th Congressional District:

Arizona’s 9th Congressional District made history in 2012, when Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) was the first openly bisexual politician ever elected to Congress. Rep. Sinema is defending her seat in this relatively new district that will hold just its second election. Sinema won the seat in 2012 by a mere 10,000 votes. Young people make up almost a quarter of the resident population in Arizona’s 9th district, and in the last midterm election, more than 27,000 young people cast their ballots. But is her moment in Congressional history enough for the incumbent to hold on to her seat this November?

AZ 9th GFX

‘My vote doesn’t make a difference’ is often a reason given for not showing up to the polls; but in this particular race—your vote (the youth vote in particular) –could be THE difference; making Congress more reflective of a diverse America.

Kyrsten Sinema meme.jpeg

3) Massachusetts 6th Congressional District:

Democrat Seth Moulton is running against Republican Richard Tisei for Massachusetts’ 6th Congressional District seat. Moulton, a 35-year-old veteran and former Marine Corps officer, is running on the slogan: “Let’s bring a new generation of leadership back to Washington.” Our generation has become disillusioned with government, seeking out change beyond Capitol Hill, but is Moulton setting precedence to change from within?

MA 6th GFX

But Moulton’s only half the ticket. Tisei recently released an ad where he spends the first half attacking his Democratic challenger, and then closes the ad with “my husband and I live right on Main Street, next door to my mom.” Is he the new face of the GOP?

Tisei Meme.jpeg

4) North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District:

Incumbent Renee Ellmers is facing challenger Clay Aiken in the race for North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District. Yes… that Clay Aiken.

NC 2nd GFX

Clay Aiken wants America’s vote again this November, but will his celebrity status help or hurt him in his battle to unseat incumbent Rep. Ellmers? Warning: Don’t ask him to sing.

clay aiken

5) Kentucky’s Senatorial Race:

The Senate race in Kentucky is closer than ever. On Tuesday, The Washington Post reported that a new Bluegrass Poll indicated the race is a statistical dead heat between Sen. Mitch McConnell (R) at 47 percent, and Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) at 46 percent.

Kentucky Senate GFX

This has been THE race to watch this election season. If Grimes wins, she could unseat incumbent Senator McConnell, who has been the Republican Senator of Kentucky since 1985 and is expected to be majority leader if Republicans gain the seats necessary to take back the Senate. But if this is THE race of the midterm election, why did the Democrats pull support for Grimes with November quickly approaching?

alison lundergan grimes meme.jpeg

For more midterm election coverage, be sure to tune in to “AM Tonight” every Tuesday at 9 pm ET on Fusion.

Credit: Victoria Moreno, Johanna Rojas and Stephanie Parra

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