Up Next

Fusion Live's game show-within-a-show, 'This or That'

'Everybody Hates Chris' star Tyler James William on his role in 'Dear White People'

‘Dear White People’ is a satire about race relations that deals with how young people cope with identity. One of the stars of the film, Tyler James Williams (the title character in the TV show “Everybody Hates Chris,”) finds a unique voice in the role of Lionel, a student who navigates through racial tension at his college.

Williams, 22, reveals why this comedy film, which started as an Indiegogo project intrigued him. “I was drawn by the script,” he says, “‘Dear White People’ was so tight, you could tell it’d been, you know, revised for 10 years…it was damn near perfect. […] I already had been having a lot of conversations with certain roles and friends about stereotypical roles in Hollywood and I hadn’t seen a homosexual role portrayed as just a regular guy who just happens to be gay.”

With instances like Ferguson, Williams admits that his perspective of law enforcement is considerably different from “the average black experience” because his father was a New York City police officer for 20 years.

“I think we’re at this interesting, you know, pinnacle, kind of like where we were in the’ 60s, of everybody trying to figure out what they are now,” Williams says.

'Everybody Hates Chris' star Tyler James William on his role in 'Dear White People'

‘Dear White People’ is a satire about race relations that deals with how young people cope with identity. One of the stars of the film, Tyler James Williams (the title character in the TV show “Everybody Hates Chris,”) finds a unique voice in the role of Lionel, a student who navigates through racial tension at his college.

Williams, 22, reveals why this comedy film, which started as an Indiegogo project intrigued him. “I was drawn by the script,” he says, “‘Dear White People’ was so tight, you could tell it’d been, you know, revised for 10 years…it was damn near perfect. […] I already had been having a lot of conversations with certain roles and friends about stereotypical roles in Hollywood and I hadn’t seen a homosexual role portrayed as just a regular guy who just happens to be gay.”

With instances like Ferguson, Williams admits that his perspective of law enforcement is considerably different from “the average black experience” because his father was a New York City police officer for 20 years.

“I think we’re at this interesting, you know, pinnacle, kind of like where we were in the’ 60s, of everybody trying to figure out what they are now,” Williams says.

WHERE TO WATCH