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Why are presidential candidates ignoring these black and latino neighborhoods in Iowa?

Republican Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina is campaigning in Iowa over the next few days, making stops at a high school, a women’s chili cook-off, and a town hall meeting among others. As a key state in the election, Iowa will be seeing every candidate—Republican and Democrat—more than once leading up to the 2016 election.

But it’s unlikely Fiorina will make any stops in some of Iowa’s most racially diverse and impoverished neighborhoods—like Little Mexico and the Sixth Avenue area of Des Moines— though the minority vote is also key to 2016. And she wouldn’t be alone. Many of these communities have yet to see a single politician come through their town, even though their votes could prove essential during the election.

“I honestly think they don’t care,” Felix Baccam told Fusion’s Enrique Acevedo. “They wanna talk about the minority vote and what they wanna do for the minority community but you never see them out here interacting with the minority people.”

Minority communities in Iowa also need the attention that candidates would bring with them. The poverty rate among Iowa’s latino and black population is much higher than that of the rest of the state, and unemployment is also high.

Fusion was in Iowa to talk to members of these communities to find out why presidential candidates are nowhere to be seen.

Watch the full interview below

 

Update: Since this story was reported, Fusion has learned that Sen. Bernie Sanders has visited one of the Des Moines locations depicted in our story.

 

Why are presidential candidates ignoring these black and latino neighborhoods in Iowa?

Republican Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina is campaigning in Iowa over the next few days, making stops at a high school, a women’s chili cook-off, and a town hall meeting among others. As a key state in the election, Iowa will be seeing every candidate—Republican and Democrat—more than once leading up to the 2016 election.

But it’s unlikely Fiorina will make any stops in some of Iowa’s most racially diverse and impoverished neighborhoods—like Little Mexico and the Sixth Avenue area of Des Moines— though the minority vote is also key to 2016. And she wouldn’t be alone. Many of these communities have yet to see a single politician come through their town, even though their votes could prove essential during the election.

“I honestly think they don’t care,” Felix Baccam told Fusion’s Enrique Acevedo. “They wanna talk about the minority vote and what they wanna do for the minority community but you never see them out here interacting with the minority people.”

Minority communities in Iowa also need the attention that candidates would bring with them. The poverty rate among Iowa’s latino and black population is much higher than that of the rest of the state, and unemployment is also high.

Fusion was in Iowa to talk to members of these communities to find out why presidential candidates are nowhere to be seen.

Watch the full interview below

 

Update: Since this story was reported, Fusion has learned that Sen. Bernie Sanders has visited one of the Des Moines locations depicted in our story.

 

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