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Fusion's Jorge Ramos on what he learned covering the 2016 race

We asked Al Gore three times if he's running for president, and he wouldn't say no

We all know where former vice president Al Gore stands when it comes to climate change, but what about a presidential bid for 2016? His name has routinely been floated as a potential Democratic candidate at every primary since losing the presidency to George W. Bush in 2000, but unlike 2004 and 2008, the environmental activist has yet to publicly rule out the possibility of a run. In fact, he’s remained especially shy on the subject this time around, keeping us all wondering about what would be a major political comeback.

But when Fusion’s Jorge Ramos had a chance to catch up with Gore in Miami while he was in town for a conference held by The Climate Reality Project (of which he is Chairman and founder), Gore carefully chose his words when asked point-blank if he will run, and never flat-out said, “No.”

“Are you considering running for president?” Ramos asked.

“I’m a recovering politician,” Gore said. “I’ve said that before but it’s still true. And the longer I go without a relapse, the less likely there will be one.”

Ramos, trying to get a more concrete answer, quickly rephrased the question: “Are you ruling out any possibility of running for president in this campaign?”

“No matter how you ask the question, I will give you the same answer. You are as skilled an interviewer as any person…”

Ramos persisted. “I just wanted to know if you want to run for president again.”

“Yet a third way of asking the question. But the answer in the form of that saying—‘I’m a recovering politician’—is really as close to the reality of my situation as I can tell you. I am not giving serious thought to that,” he replied. “I am grateful in some ways that people will ask the question, but I am enjoying what I am doing in my life right now. I am trying to affect the political system in this country and in other countries around the world and I’m enjoying that.”

Ramos asked, “If this is the case, why do you think people are pressuring you and Vice President Joe Biden to run for the nomination of the Democratic party?”

While Gore did not comment on Hillary Clinton (and Democrats’ uneasiness about her email debacle), or any other Democratic presidential candidate, he did suggest that a lot could change in the next year.

“The general impression conveyed by the intense coverage of this election is that people are going to vote tomorrow, or next week,” he said. “I’ve been to four national campaigns and I can confirm for you that this election is more than a year away.”

Indeed, a lot can change in a year, but it was about a year before both the 2004 and 2008 election when Gore silenced rumors of a run. So if all was going according to plan, he’d be squashing those rumors just about now.

Watch the full interview below:

Related content:

We asked Al Gore three times if he's running for president, and he wouldn't say no

We all know where former vice president Al Gore stands when it comes to climate change, but what about a presidential bid for 2016? His name has routinely been floated as a potential Democratic candidate at every primary since losing the presidency to George W. Bush in 2000, but unlike 2004 and 2008, the environmental activist has yet to publicly rule out the possibility of a run. In fact, he’s remained especially shy on the subject this time around, keeping us all wondering about what would be a major political comeback.

But when Fusion’s Jorge Ramos had a chance to catch up with Gore in Miami while he was in town for a conference held by The Climate Reality Project (of which he is Chairman and founder), Gore carefully chose his words when asked point-blank if he will run, and never flat-out said, “No.”

“Are you considering running for president?” Ramos asked.

“I’m a recovering politician,” Gore said. “I’ve said that before but it’s still true. And the longer I go without a relapse, the less likely there will be one.”

Ramos, trying to get a more concrete answer, quickly rephrased the question: “Are you ruling out any possibility of running for president in this campaign?”

“No matter how you ask the question, I will give you the same answer. You are as skilled an interviewer as any person…”

Ramos persisted. “I just wanted to know if you want to run for president again.”

“Yet a third way of asking the question. But the answer in the form of that saying—‘I’m a recovering politician’—is really as close to the reality of my situation as I can tell you. I am not giving serious thought to that,” he replied. “I am grateful in some ways that people will ask the question, but I am enjoying what I am doing in my life right now. I am trying to affect the political system in this country and in other countries around the world and I’m enjoying that.”

Ramos asked, “If this is the case, why do you think people are pressuring you and Vice President Joe Biden to run for the nomination of the Democratic party?”

While Gore did not comment on Hillary Clinton (and Democrats’ uneasiness about her email debacle), or any other Democratic presidential candidate, he did suggest that a lot could change in the next year.

“The general impression conveyed by the intense coverage of this election is that people are going to vote tomorrow, or next week,” he said. “I’ve been to four national campaigns and I can confirm for you that this election is more than a year away.”

Indeed, a lot can change in a year, but it was about a year before both the 2004 and 2008 election when Gore silenced rumors of a run. So if all was going according to plan, he’d be squashing those rumors just about now.

Watch the full interview below:

Related content:

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