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Can Twitter solve political corruption? A small town in Spain thinks so

The mayor of a small town in southern Spain is using Twitter as his main method of communicating with its 3,500 citizens.

Jose Antonio Rodriguez Salas says Twitter creates transparency and trust between the people and their politicians, while giving everyone a sense of freedom and immediacy.

“There’s a very serious problem with corruption in Spain, in Greece, in Italy,” the mayor told Fusion. “There are countries that have profound political corruption. We’ve done a great job with transparency to show that Twitter solves all of this.”

It’s all part of a larger plan that Salas began four years ago, promising anyone can tweet at the mayor or his staff and someone will take action in minutes. So far, he’s lived up to that promise.

Every single city employee now has a Twitter handle, including the street sweeper who has over 1,000 followers. Salas himself has 363,000 followers—that’s over 1,000 more than New York Mayor Bill de Blasio. He encourages city officials to be open through Twitter by setting an example: Salas will tweet about anything from book recommendations to his private medical records.

“I think Twitter is very happy with us. Jack Dorsey is very thrilled with our project.”

 

Can Twitter solve political corruption? A small town in Spain thinks so

The mayor of a small town in southern Spain is using Twitter as his main method of communicating with its 3,500 citizens.

Jose Antonio Rodriguez Salas says Twitter creates transparency and trust between the people and their politicians, while giving everyone a sense of freedom and immediacy.

“There’s a very serious problem with corruption in Spain, in Greece, in Italy,” the mayor told Fusion. “There are countries that have profound political corruption. We’ve done a great job with transparency to show that Twitter solves all of this.”

It’s all part of a larger plan that Salas began four years ago, promising anyone can tweet at the mayor or his staff and someone will take action in minutes. So far, he’s lived up to that promise.

Every single city employee now has a Twitter handle, including the street sweeper who has over 1,000 followers. Salas himself has 363,000 followers—that’s over 1,000 more than New York Mayor Bill de Blasio. He encourages city officials to be open through Twitter by setting an example: Salas will tweet about anything from book recommendations to his private medical records.

“I think Twitter is very happy with us. Jack Dorsey is very thrilled with our project.”

 

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