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With 'Five-O,' all US citizens can now rate police officers in their communities

Three Georgia teens created ‘Five-O,’ an app that rates police officers and their interactions with the public.

Asha, Ima and Caleb Christian started working on Five-O earlier this year and launched it in August. The app rates officers on an A through F scale. The app also has features like creating incident reports, community message boards, police grades and reviews, as well as an easy bill of rights.

The co-creators of the app told Fusion Live they want to focus on highlighting how police serve their constituents.

“All of the information given to us by the user is available to every United States citizen that has the application. They can search it by zip code, state and county.”

“I would say we have a 60/40 ratio of negative to positive thus far on the app,” said Ima Christian. They described some of those interactions reviewed on their app. “An example of a positive comment that we had was a woman from Texas. She said that as she was being pulled over, she asked if she could record the interaction and the officer actually offered to hold her smart phone for her as he was interacting for her. And an example of a negative interaction that happened was a lady had car trouble and she asked an officer to help her and the officer didn’t heLp her and went back to playing video games on his mobile device.”

The Christian siblings designed the app with the support of their parents and family friends who work in law enforcement.

With 'Five-O,' all US citizens can now rate police officers in their communities

Three Georgia teens created ‘Five-O,’ an app that rates police officers and their interactions with the public.

Asha, Ima and Caleb Christian started working on Five-O earlier this year and launched it in August. The app rates officers on an A through F scale. The app also has features like creating incident reports, community message boards, police grades and reviews, as well as an easy bill of rights.

The co-creators of the app told Fusion Live they want to focus on highlighting how police serve their constituents.

“All of the information given to us by the user is available to every United States citizen that has the application. They can search it by zip code, state and county.”

“I would say we have a 60/40 ratio of negative to positive thus far on the app,” said Ima Christian. They described some of those interactions reviewed on their app. “An example of a positive comment that we had was a woman from Texas. She said that as she was being pulled over, she asked if she could record the interaction and the officer actually offered to hold her smart phone for her as he was interacting for her. And an example of a negative interaction that happened was a lady had car trouble and she asked an officer to help her and the officer didn’t heLp her and went back to playing video games on his mobile device.”

The Christian siblings designed the app with the support of their parents and family friends who work in law enforcement.

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