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The Patriot Act is probably coming back, but we'll enjoy our three private days

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In 2001 President George W. Bush signed the Patriot Act, giving the government broad surveillance powers. But over time, many people’s skepticism about the act has grown.

A recent Pew Survey shows that three-fourths of Americans feel it’s “very important” to control who can collect information on them. And between advances in our communications technology and leaks by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, why wouldn’t we?

Chief among us is Senator Rand Paul, who has created a contrast between himself and other Republicans on this issue.

The act expired at midnight last night, but later this week, the Senate will likely restore much of it. This all boils down to about a three-day window where no one will be listening to our business.

You wanna call your mistress? Dial up! Place an extra order of breadsticks with that meat-lovers’ pizza? Go for it! No one will judge, because no one will hear you.

And no matter how the privacy legislation turns out, plenty of Americans will continue to voluntarily hand over their information to Big Brother for the sake of convenience.

Google announced that they plan to offer a contextual mobile search that will give users specific answers based on what they’re currently doing. As if we all needed another reason not to use our cell phones while on the toilet!

The Patriot Act is probably coming back, but we'll enjoy our three private days

CHST Banner

In 2001 President George W. Bush signed the Patriot Act, giving the government broad surveillance powers. But over time, many people’s skepticism about the act has grown.

A recent Pew Survey shows that three-fourths of Americans feel it’s “very important” to control who can collect information on them. And between advances in our communications technology and leaks by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden, why wouldn’t we?

Chief among us is Senator Rand Paul, who has created a contrast between himself and other Republicans on this issue.

The act expired at midnight last night, but later this week, the Senate will likely restore much of it. This all boils down to about a three-day window where no one will be listening to our business.

You wanna call your mistress? Dial up! Place an extra order of breadsticks with that meat-lovers’ pizza? Go for it! No one will judge, because no one will hear you.

And no matter how the privacy legislation turns out, plenty of Americans will continue to voluntarily hand over their information to Big Brother for the sake of convenience.

Google announced that they plan to offer a contextual mobile search that will give users specific answers based on what they’re currently doing. As if we all needed another reason not to use our cell phones while on the toilet!

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